The World Concave – Harbor

Album cover

Summary

  • Members from Elemae, The Fire Still Burns, (Damn) This Desert Air, M.N.B., Wilhelm
  • * FREE DOWNLOAD * of “Jehovah’s Witness Protection Program” is available on Exploding In Sound’s ‘In Case Of Evacuation’ digital compilation alongside an awesome array of artists such as Crippled Black Phoenix, Wintersleep, Open Hand, Old Canes, The Twilight Sad, Caspian, Digital Homicide, Disappearer, We Were Promised Jetpacks, Anakin, Red Fang, Actors&Actresses, Weird Owl and a ton more! www.explodinginsound.com
  • Engineered & Mixed at Portrait Recording Studios, Pompton Plains, NJ by Chris Badami.

Track Listing

  1. 4:44 a.m.
  2. Jehovah’s Witness Protection Program
  3. I Sold My Life
  4. Personal Day
  5. Holiday
  6. Digging The Honest Dirt
  7. The Farthest Reefs We Reach

About this Release

Buy on The World Concave-Harbor

Listen: http://theworldconcave.bandcamp.com/

The members of The World Concave crafted a “mini-album” of somber, “thought-provoking” songs, melodically gliding along an indie rock timeline.Although reminiscent of classic alternative/college rock, their debut 7-song CD, Harbor, is a memorable batch of songs, sounding non-contrived in the modern day. There’s a good amount of soul-bearing going on here, yet suspicions of over-earnestness are dowsed in exchange for thought provoking conversations amongst the subject matter. Alongside detailed percussion, dynamic guitars, and melancholic piano, there’s enough on here to call this heady music for the heavy hearted.

Though mostly written and recorded over the greater part of 2009/2010, there are ideas on ‘Harbor’ that date back 10 years, as members of The World Concave have been in and out of multi-genre based musical projects together for longer. From post-hardcore to eclectic instrumental jazz-rock, these musical projects are what added character to the more focused songwriting you’ll find here. The timing seemed right to finally assemble a band and pull these ideas together. Once the ball was rolling, the chemistry hit an all time high and a set of moody, alternative rock songs resulted fairly quick. Although various portions were realized in their individual homes, the band tracked the majority of Harbor at Portrait Recording Studios in Pompton Plains, NJ, a three story barn turned state-of-the-art recording studio which only added to the creative process.

Reviews

SoundSenseonline.co.uk

As the exciting colours of summer slowly blur into the mellow shades of Autumn, what better time to become acquainted with the subtle, chilled sound of New Jersey quintet The World Concave? Released in the UK in July, the band’s debut effort Harbor brings together languid rhythms and smooth instrumentals – reserved for those contented, lazy days.

4:44am opens with a lengthy instrumental; a faithful introduction not just to this track, but to the soothing tones you can expect from those that follow. Jehovah’s Witness Protection Program builds upon these instrumental layers, adding a few more guitars and some louder percussion to fulfil their alternative genre pool. Here, lead vocalist Craig Cirinelli echoes Lost Prophets’ lead-man Ian Watkins (unlike in the previous track); his vocals perhaps lifted by the increasing power of the guitars. Lyrically, the song fulfils its title; an alternative anecdote surrounding the woes of the life of a Jehovah’s Witness… a political statement or a personal endeavour?

As the EP moves forward, the listener can begin to appreciate the production process that enabled it to come together so effortlessly. Through their combination of musical talents, The World Concave have consciously blended several musical stylings to produce a uniquely alternative sound. I Sold My Life not only begins with a simple, yet quirky ‘rewind’ guitar sample, it introduces jazzy piano twinkles and harmonic, echoing female vocals (provided by special guest Alexandra Ausman) as extra layers to the perfectly structured track.

Playing around with head bopping bass, catchy drum steps and dark, eery samples, Personal Day almost seems like it belongs on a separate album; one where The World Concave were told to do something completely off the books, a side project perhaps. Yet, despite this stark contrast, you seemingly accept that the track belongs on this album, acting almost as a taster of other things to come.

Digging The Honest Dirt brings a folky twist to this collection, but somehow doesn’t seem to continue the same strength and structure of the release as a whole. Finally, ‘Harbor’ comes to a close with The Farthest Reefs We Reach; a stunning instrumental track, and a last chance to showcase The World Concave’s musical talents.

Final Verdict

Much like staring out thoughtfully towards the sea, ‘Harbor’ loses you in its soft, layered waves of indie, folk, and alternative music. Although some of the tracks feel somewhat longer than you’d expect from a similar release, the combination of solemn vocals and sleepy instrumentals provide the perfect balance for the band’s musical outreach.

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SoundSenseonline.co.uk

As the exciting colours of summer slowly blur into the mellow shades of Autumn, what better time to become acquainted with the subtle, chilled sound of New Jersey quintet The World Concave? Released in the UK in July, the band’s debut effort Harbor brings together languid rhythms and smooth instrumentals – reserved for those contented, lazy days.
4:44am opens with a lengthy instrumental; a faithful introduction not just to this track, but to the soothing tones you can expect from those that follow. Jehovah’s Witness Protection Program builds upon these instrumental layers, adding a few more guitars and some louder percussion to fulfil their alternative genre pool. Here, lead vocalist Craig Cirinelli echoes Lost Prophets’ lead-man Ian Watkins (unlike in the previous track); his vocals perhaps lifted by the increasing power of the guitars. Lyrically, the song fulfils its title; an alternative anecdote surrounding the woes of the life of a Jehovah’s Witness… a political statement or a personal endeavour? As the EP moves forward, the listener can begin to appreciate the production process that enabled it to come together so effortlessly.

Through their combination of musical talents, The World Concave have consciously blended several musical stylings to produce a uniquely alternative sound. I Sold My Life not only begins with a simple, yet quirky ‘rewind’ guitar sample, it introduces jazzy piano twinkles and harmonic, echoing female vocals (provided by special guest Alexandra Ausman) as extra layers to the perfectly structured track. Playing around with head bopping bass, catchy drum steps and dark, eery samples, Personal Day almost seems like it belongs on a separate album; one where The World Concave were told to do something completely off the books, a side project perhaps. Yet, despite this stark contrast, you seemingly accept that the track belongs on this album, acting almost as a taster of other things to come. Digging The Honest Dirt brings a folky twist to this collection, but somehow doesn’t seem to continue the same strength and structure of the release as a whole. Finally, ‘Harbor’ comes to a close with The Farthest Reefs We Reach; a stunning instrumental track, and a last chance to showcase The World Concave’s musical talents.

Final Verdict
Much like staring out thoughtfully towards the sea, ‘Harbor’ loses you in its soft, layered waves of indie, folk, and alternative music. Although some of the tracks feel somewhat longer than you’d expect from a similar release, the combination of solemn vocals and sleepy instrumentals provide the perfect balance for the band’s musical outreach.

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RockFreaks

Although “Harbor” was mostly written throughout 2009/2010, there are ideas on it that ‘date back about ten years’, or so the info-sheet says. This would imply that the members aren’t the youngest of musicians – they have clearly been around a while, in and out of various musical projects all exploring different sounds and genres and so on, so in a way “Harbor” is the culmination of all that as they put everything into their new project: The World Concave.

Having been around a while, the members of The World Concave are seemingly now at that stage where their music is less emotional, direct and/or angsty, and instead relaxed, softer and more thought-out. 90s alternative and emo influences such as Sunny Day Real Estate and American Football can be traced in this band’s mid-tempo approach to song-writing, while the mid-tempo aspect likely comes from progressive and indie influences, as they focus more on crafting delicate, immaculately produced soundscapes through intricate and free-flowing layered instrumentation. This makes the overall listening experience of the album a cohesive one; it’s like being gently lulled into a trance, and you won’t be shaken from it as each song flows seamlessly to the next.

Despite this seven-song offering being their debut under this name, it does not feel like a debut usually would. It’s not rough around the edges, it doesn’t suffer from inconsistency or too much of their music heroes’ sound dominating what they are trying to achieve. It’s an impressive and confident release, ripe with fresh ideas – a tell-tale sign of the fact that these guys have been around for a while, have clearly spent a great deal of time working on it, and are comfortable with each other and who they are now.

7.5/10

http://www.rockfreaks.net/albums/4157

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Top Hat Magazine (UK)

Opening track “4:44am” brings with it the tinkling guitar tones and soft, contemplative vocals of Taking Back Sunday circa ‘My Blue Heaven’; but the tension rises along with the introduction of thoughtful lyrics, detailed melodies and musical arrangements.

This is all carried in a way that sounds easy listening, but has an undertone that suggests something more unsettling. Second track “Jehovahs Witness Program” has a driving drum beat to it that carries the intricate guitar and bass notes; and ‘I Sold My Life’ showcases some gorgeous piano.

“Personal Day” keeps the listener on their toes with the introduction and withdrawal of deep bass and then light, complex guitars and vocals that reminded me of William Control’s “All Due Restraint” (In my opinion, not a bad thing!).

For the duration of the record you’ll find much of the same – Altogether danceable, somewhat trance-y beats with a dark undertone and vocals you can get lost in. Not necessarily one for your summer playlist, but absolutely perfect for long and thoughtful nights in.

Previous reviews have called this mini-album “heady music for the heavy hearted” and I definitely agree. I love it.

For fans of: William Control, Twin Atlantic, Joy Division
Stand out tracks: Personal Day, I Sold My Soul. (4/5)
-Hannah Neild

http://www.tophatmagazine.com/Reviews/The-World-Concave-H

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Elysium

The World Concave are prefectly equipped to lull you into a state of relaxation with pitch perfect harmonies, smooth guitar riffs, and piano sequences. This EP is an aundio-minefield and it takes an open mind to discover all the secrets hidden within their music. ‘Harbor’ is an easy-listening, almost acoustic sounding EP from five guys (and the occasional pianist) with a convexly dark way of looking at the world.

The EP opens wonderfully with ’4.44am’ with beautiful harmonies and smooth guitar work. As you listen to the track you’ll instantly feel all your worries start to drift away. Following on, ‘Jehovahs WItness Protection Program’ shows the band to be experimenting with time changes, gently brushed drumming, simplistic riffs, and slightly more contrasting vocals.

The highlight of this EP, with a doubt, is ‘I Sold My Life’. The track opens with jazz piano undertones with elongated vocal work and gentle drumming. A female counterpart serves backing vocals to the chorus, to add dimension to the track. A touch of lightly distorted guitars in the latter part of the song, followed by further piano harmonies, perk the track up by adding an ambience. The World Concave’s biggest strength lies in their lyric writing, making you think twice as you absorb their sound. The lyrics “I’m always selling my life to someone else” in this particular track, leave a lasting impression on my mind at least.

As ‘Personal Day’ opens, you’ll start to see a more haunting and darker side to The World Concave, and how they see the world. Paradoxical lyrics such as “you stole my shadow” and “i sleep awake in my bed” will take on quite a haunting meaning as they vocally play through your ears over bass drums and gentle guitar strums.

On a side note: do you love Christmas? The smell of cinnamon in the air? The decorations? The pine needles on the shaggy rug carpet? Well, The World Concave do not like Christmas, as summed up by ‘Holiday’. This is a short track about winter blues and lost loves around Christmas.

Following on with the dark ambience, ‘Digging Honest Dirt’ opens with gentle acoustics, piano notes and brushed drumrolls, sliding headfirst into a mildly fiaster pace with harmonic vocals, faster riffs and piano loops. Lyrically, once again leaving an impression with lines such as: “I knew it would hurt but i didn’t make a sound”.

The finale of the EP is ‘The Farthest Reefs We Reach’. This is the most unsettling piece of music i have ever heard. This is an instrumental track that will send a chill down your spine with haunting piano sequences and intense drum rolls fading in and out of the two minute track.

This is clearly a well written masterpiece of an EP, however The World Concave need to be careful of falling into the pattern of regurgitating the same dark, acoustic material track after track. Whereas, The World Concave will ease the stress and tension after a busy day of city life, you’ll struggle to listen to them in your everyday life – this is one of those CDs you keep in your record collection for one dealing with one of lifes little ‘moments’. Rated: 7/10

http://elysiummedia.webs.com/apps/blog/show/7537732-the-w

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UNSEEN

Harbour is the new EP by alternative band The World Concave, consisting of a series of solemn songs which have a knack for haunting melodies and moving lyrics. With the songs characterised by beautiful breakdown melodies, effortless vocals and careful instrumentation it makes the album perfect for a worrying mind in need of soothing.
The tracks I Sold My Life and Holiday capture the gravity of the musical message of the band, with touching vocals and beautiful melodies that reach out to the listener forcing emotion. However some tracks on the EP can lack variation in melody in places which prevents the listener from following the same journey through the song as the writer. This has been avoided in tracks such as I Sold My Life where there is some enchanting ornate melody produced by the background piano and a simple yet powerful guitar solo, making the track an interesting listen for the audience.
The opening track 4:44am has flashes of brilliance with a captivating bridge and some truly heart rending lyrics. This combined with glimpses of heavier rock influences in their electric guitar melodies makes the track highly enjoyable, but due to the tracks long winded introduction it’s difficult to get into and appreciate fully until it reaches these sections.
The gravitas of the music continues throughout the album with little deviation from their preliminary style, except for in the track Jehova’s Witness Protection Program which provides a great upbeat addition to the record. The song is a rockier track with some grungier guitar melodies, providing a rawer sound. The continuation in style is great for the fans of this type of music; however for the more eclectic fan it may feel a bit repetitive.
The overall sound of the album is a good example of careful crafting of music to create a specific sound that is able to reach a listener on numerous emotive levels. Although it occasionally lacks in attitude it is still able to be appreciated well. -Abi Pitts

http://www.weareunseen.co.uk/#/the-world-concave/45528311

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Salad Days Magazine (IT)

I don’t think a title like “Jehovah’s Witness Protection Program” means anything more than a way to mock religion (not “of” religion, mind you), for what is the best song on the mini-album (only seven pieces ) for a record that doesn’t joke at all. The original band from New Jersey, with members who boast very diverse and eclectic musical experience (from post-hardcore to jazz-rock instrumental, with members from Elemae, The Fire Still Burns (Damn) This Desert Air, MNB, Wilhelm ), debuted on Engineer Records with a piece of work that takes all the stylistic features of Alternative/College Rock: light pieces, low profiles, acoustic notes, which do not oppose the slightest obstacle to the listener, such as the opener “4: 44″ or “Digging The Honest Dirt ” which features piano, clean guitar and good dynamics. If we were to find fault, I would recommend the proposal of excessive uniformity, enhanced by the production, all very melancholy, even by the expert Chris Badami (Dillinger Escape Plan, The Early November, I Can Make A Mess Like Nobody’s Business) . -Flavio Ignelzi

http://www.saladdaysmag.com/2011/06/reviews-update-64/

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Time To Explore

The World Concave – Harbor (EP)
Harbor is the latest seven track, mini-album from The World Concave. Complete with sombre, thought-provoking tracks, detailed percussion, dynamic guitar riffs and melancholic piano, they have created something not for the faint-hearted.

Their alternative-rock style EP, has produced tracks built not to make you smile and tap your feet, but to reminisce and think – ‘Personal day’ and ‘Holiday’ do just that. This ‘moody-rock’ mini-album, showcases melancholy vocals and soothing melodies throughout. Track, ’4.44am’ has that relaxed rock feel and soothes the ear like a City and Colour track but with a little more depth. At times it feels like maybe something is missing, maybe a stronger vocal set like the one attempted towards the end of the second track, ‘Jahovah’s witness protection program’ – a track which is instrumentally very strong. Beautifully incorporating melancholic piano keys, are ‘Digging the honest dirt’, and ‘I sold my life’. Both well-written and structured tracks with nice harmonies.

The final track, ‘The farthest reefs we reach’, is purely instrumental. It builds ominously and could easily be the soundtrack to an unwritten horror film or failing that a witch hunt. What the track does however show, is how talented these guys truly are.

http://rach-itstimetoexplore.blogspot.com/2011/06/world-c

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Manifesto

New Jersey’s The World Concave’s mini-album ‘Harbour’ consists of seven tracks of misery-tinged college rock. The tone drifts between the electronically rhythmic as seen in ‘Personal Day’, to the drearily forlorn sounds of ’4.44am’. The vocals compliment the murky and at once accessibly viable tunes well, and there’s some impressive harmony work going on to boot. The only thing is ‘Harbour’ can’t seem to push itself out from under the weight of it’s own gloom, and as a result, feels all a bit similar.

http://www.bunkeruk.com/manifesto/cd-reviews/561-the-worl

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With Love, The Underground

Fans of low profile bands with depth should take THE WORLD CONCAVE from New Jersey to heart. Most of the songs on “Harbor” show the band from its atmospheric side and although “Jehovah’s witness protection program” or “I sold my life” takes plenty of time to build, something captivates the listener and the vocals are absolutely worth listening to, as it is sung here real time. Dan, Craig and Cooper come from Elemae, which are no longer as active, yet a newer band (DAMN) THIS DESERT AIR came after (with TWC members). “4:44am” is a terrific song for fans of SUNNY DAY REAL ESTATE or the solo album from Jeremy Enigk. Hypnotic, atmospheric rock that is dreamy in spite of being boring and the piano passages are very intoxicating and often have a British touch. Thomas Eberhardt

7 out of 10

http://www.wltu-music.de/

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Rock Sound

The World Concave – made up from members of (Damn) This Desert Air and Ex Number Five – have a seriousness that may take (D)TDA fans a few listens to get accustomed to. The ambitious shift in songwriting into somber, thought-provoking songs like “I Sold My Life” and “4:44 a.m” are swathed in shades of gray, but maintain a very grounded spirit. Introspective without sliding into studio sterility, the band manage to create aching harmonies reminiscent of The National, while retaining a stripped back subtlety. Never droll or indulgent, TWC strike out in a steady musical trajectory that should see them get the musical respect that they deserve. 8/10 -Faye Lewis

http://www.rocksound.tv

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Stagediving Webzine (IT)

It ‘a hard enough time out like that, but certainly a good level. It’s “Harbor”, the latest effort of the U.S. The World Concave, released on Engineer Records. I say usually because the band plays out a indie / pop is very light, with well-structured pieces, drums and delicate guitar, ambient elements, samples, songs suffused keyboards / organs. Excellent production, great artwork, you see a job that is America. The album has 7 pieces, so the boundary between EP and CD, and comes in a digipak very minimal, which uses the image of a pelican. The lyrics investigate issues fairly standard, personal, etc…(“…you hand me my savior right next to a convenience store, you think I’m lost just leave me lost..”). :) A great job, after all, I recommend it to those who are open to different sounds from those discussed on this site, as a pleasant interlude between a breakdown and another.

http://www.stagedivingwebzine.com/products/eat-me-clown-t

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The Ripple Effect

It’s almost hard to imagine a set of musicians making an album like this anymore.  In this day of fast paced, fast produced, overly-glossed Super Bowl half-time shows where sparklers and space suits take the place of music and craft, no one is supposed to care about their art anymore.  No one is supposed to create music of this tenor.  It’s all about the quick buck.  All about the download.  The YouTube clip.

Well let me be the first to tell you, any YouTube clip from these New Jersey natives, The World Concave, will never eclipse 1,000,000 hits.  Few of the short-attention-span web cruisers would dare to have the patience to let even one track from this album unfold.   Harbor goes against everything that is “the way” in the music industry today.

Perhaps that’s why I’m so in love with this album.

Recently Robbers dropped a soul-searching bomb on me like this.  Before that, years past, The Blue Nile used to routinely break convention with a similar works of somber beauty.  Today, we have The World Concave.

This is an album of hidden beauty.  An album that doesn’t just reward repeat listenings, it requires them. To “get” this album, I had to peel back all the preconceptions of my stoner/metal mind, clear out the clutter and the noise and allow the album to become my world.  I had to step inside it, as if it was some magical kingdom inside the wardrobe.  And once I did, a vision of fantastic lushness opened to greet me.

Guitars chime and layer and percolate.  Bass leads in gently; no pushing, just gently pulling — drawing me closer.  Piano keys clink and resonate with stark isolation and beauty.  Drums don’t pound as much as they provide a heartbeat, a pulse.  Meanwhile, airy vocals float above it all like a celestial being, shining down upon all creation.

Sublime.

Nothing is rushed with this album. Each note is given space to inhale and breath, as if taking a life of it’s own. Ambient space is just as important an instrument in this work as is the guitar or bass.

And that brings up one of the many dichotomies and contradictions of the album. For all of it’s space and airiness, Harbor is actually crushingly heavy. In tone, in mood, in lyric. Despite it’s beauty, this isn’t an album of light and joy and promise. It’s an album of open wounds and exposed nerves. In many ways, Harbor is as heavy as many metal albums, and in many ways, Harbor is more daring than many metal albums. Rather than relying on force or growling or ferocity to convey angst, The World Concave display their pain amongst tickling pianos and hushed tones.

Trust me, that can me much more powerful than some tattooed guy screaming at me. Lost amongst the gorgeous harmonics of the guitar and brushed drums, “4:44 A.M.” drops in lyrical bombs like “I wish I could escape/ my body’s been abused/ in nature’s way a fuck you.” Not what you’d expect to hear, and that’s the point.

The violence lies in the peace. The despair hides in the beauty. It’s in that dichotomy that the album works so well. Think of it as ambient metal. Metal sans the noise, just the tone.

And none of this talk of “space” and “beauty” and “airy” really means that these guys can’t rock out. They don’t do it very often, but when they do, it’s all the more powerful because of the time it took to get there. Beginning with “4.44 AM.” around 3:00 in, the guitar tone suddenly changes. It’s subtle and only lasts for about 10 seconds, but damn is it heavy. It’s ominous, like some nearing beast, a threatening breath upon the nape of my neck, a deathly cold hand placed on my shoulder. Then, as quickly as it emerged, it’s gone, back to the acoustic picking. The hushed tones. But still, in the back of my mind it lingers.

“Jehovah’s Witness Protection Program,” picks up where those haunting tones left off. Echoing guitar leads us in, as if walking though a darkened haze. Suddenly, the pace picks up with some serious time shifts and strumming guitar. It all seems so effortless, as the melody picks up into what is probably the most immediate song on the album. Gorgeous harmony vocals float through the mix, like some disembodied spirit, not sure if it wants to join the proceedings or not. “You think I’m lost/just leave me lost,” our narrator moans, tossing away the leaflet advertising his true savior. Then, as we near the end, we get the explosion. “I’ll find my meadow without your cattle run!” the vocals urge. Finally, we have the payoff we’ve been waiting for. Brief again, but the anger and emotion in that vocal passage makes it all worthwhile. With the drums driving underneath, the pace is intense, as is the mood.

I’ve already written more than I intended to, so let’s be brief. “I Sold My Life,” has just a freaking fantastic structure, with it’s neo-jazzy framework, layered acoustic piano, and stuttering drums and bass. Probably the best vocals, and some gorgeous female harmonies as well. Simply a killer song full of despondency and pain, but tempered by the sheer beauty of the arrangement. “Personal Day,” is one of the more languid tracks with it’s near chill-funk bass, ambient tones, and is truly worthy of anything The Blue Nile ever did. Toss in some polyrhythmic percussion and a truly memorable line “I’m taking a personal day”, and we got another winner.

“Holiday,” and “Digging The Honest Dirt” keep the dynamic tension high with alternating passages of gentle splendor and tempered aggression, all leading to the ambient-jazzy instrumental outro.

Harbor definitely isn’t an album for every mood, time or day, but when that proper time and space come about, I’ll have a hard time finding an album I’ll reach for quicker.
–Racer

http://ripplemusic.blogspot.com/2011/02/world-concave-har

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RoomThireen (UK)

American ensemble The World Concave are setting sail on a new musical voyage, with “Harbor” the name of their vessel. This is an intriguing emotional excursion, but do be aware that this is unlikely to leave you with a brighter outlook on life and you will probably be glad to get home. This by no means an uneventful adventure, but the overall mood here is far from positive.

Setting the tone for the album, ’4:44 A.M.’ therapeutically massages the listener’s ears and subtly builds with layer upon layer of reverb-soaked vocals. The reverse snare drum effect, however, treads a very fine line between being effective and distracting. Only personal taste will dictate whether it is the former or the latter. Despite a lengthy introduction, ‘Jehovah’s Witness Protection Program’ proves to be one of the strongest tracks of the album. The heavy emphasis on rhythm adds substantial excitement, with the song also climaxing very effectively indeed. Traces of the previous track’s spirited style seem to have leaked into ‘I Sold My Life,’ helping to sustain momentum. The ad-lib piano style works well and the reverse effects are managed impressively.

By the time the album reaches ‘Personal Day,’ the vehicle seems to have run dry of fuel. The electronic drum timbres added are at first refreshing, but the composition lacks ambition and there is ultimately little to write home about. Typical rock ballad ‘Holiday’ builds colourfully and the well-harmonised vocals of singer Craig Cirinelli particularly impress. The tones of the acoustic and electric guitars combine beautifully and the eventual addition of the drums feels very natural. The segue into ‘Digging the Honest Dirt’ is absolutely seamless, with the welcome return of guest pianist Bob McHugh also remaining very discreet. Rounding off the album is the drifting instrumental track ‘The Farthest Reefs We Reach;’ a relatively uneventful track with the exception of two unbefitting fills from drummer Dan Nolan that seem to spawn from nowhere. We all love a good drum solo and/or fill, but unfortunately this is not the right time or place.

At seven tracks in length, “Harbor” feels more like an EP than an album. However, extending the album unnecessarily could have had detrimental consequences and the 31 minute duration seems suitably restrained. The World Concave run the risk of being swept under the rug like so many implacable alternative acts, but if you approach “Harbor” with the appropriate mindset, this album could actually be of great appeal. -James Stant

http://www.roomthirteen.com/cd_reviews/11617/World_Concav

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Beatzone

(Translated) A young bunch of New Jerseians, docked with the label Engineer Records where they released their melancholy debut called ‘Harbor’ with its focus on creating music in an “art rock” style of indie rock with lyrics that have a point-of-view in seeing the other side. Not that they have, but still it is good they form their opinions, in a self-assesment kind of way. Thus, without straightforward lyrics, the music compliments as not being straightforward.

The album contains 7 tracks in 31:20 minutes, and the digipak design can be purchased for $ 5 by downloading from their site. The sound quality and mix is at a very high level.

It’s hard to highlight the strength, because each member is an integral part of this great group. A blissfully melodic singing voice is accompanied by instruments, fittingly by the other members. I’m usually not a big fan of the piano in connection with rock (I take it with Ultravox, Falco) yet here with The World Concave it is also a success. Piano + guitar in faster repetitions sits above other instruments/music to offset the slow appearance. Artistic drumming combined with this classic-jazz style guitar playing, leaves us without many arrears. Although they do overall play rock music, their variation is very creative. So I highly recommend this album to anyone and suggest checking out a concert as well.
Interesting. -Alan Rohan

http://beatzone.cz/clanky/recenze/576-the-world-concave–

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